History of Semiconductor Integrated Circuit Packaging

Since the first developments of electrically powered technology in the mid-1800s, engineers, scientists, and manufacturers have created a diverse, multifaceted industry that fabricates millions of devices for a broad variety of purposes. Today’s massive demand for more and more intelligent designs and sustainable solutions functions in tandem with internationally standardized regulations in the industry. Not only are manufacturing practices and production facilities required to meet these industrial standards, but also the parts and assemblies themselves are standardized. This regimenting of basic components is beneficial to all manufacturing industries, not just electronics devices, and it’s created a production and distribution system that supports the work of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and contract manufacturers like us. MultiSource Manufacturing LLC provides semiconductor parts production and electromechanical assembly operations for several electronic device industries, including medical, defense, aerospace, and more.

Semiconductor

A critical part of the semiconductor and electronics production process is the fabrication and assembly of electrical packaging. Building the integrated circuit packaging used to encapsulate and work with the semiconductor microchip is another standardized process. We build high-quality packages that fit multiple current standards depending on the semiconductor and the application of the entire kit.

Earliest Circuit Packages

The earliest circuit packages were built in the 1960s. The first package was built in 1962 by Y. Tao, and it was the first version of ceramic flat packs, a packaging format that the U.S. military would use for several years. These ceramic packages are small and reliable designs.

The first integrated circuit package was developed in the 1970s. These designs also used ceramic as the main package material with all of the circuit leads along the same side of the chip. The first plastic package designs were dual in-line packages (DIP) that were developed in the late 1970s.

Pin Grid Arrays

By the 1980s, chips needed to grow to meet larger, smarter, and more intricate device specifications. This demand led to pin grid arrays (PGAs) and leadless chip carriers, in addition to surface mount packaging. These surface mount designs could take up to 30-50% less surface space with about 70% less thickness than DIP packages.

Area Array Packages

In the early 1990s, the area array package was the next significant design development. This led to the popularizing of the ball grid array (BGA) and other array packaging techniques. Next, the plastic quad flat pack and thin small outline packages replaced PGAs for most devices.

From PGA to Land Grid

Industry leaders moved from PGA packages to land grid arrays in the 2000s, but most microprocessors still use PGA designs. BGA packages also grew into flip-chip ball grid arrays (FCBGA) that inverted the mounting of the die.

There have been several other recent packaging developments over the last 10 years, such as System in Package (SiP) and multi-chip modules (MCMs). MultiSource Manufacturing is capable of producing several types of packages with varying formats and materials.

Semiconductor Components

To learn more about our work with semiconductor components, contact us at (952) 456-5500. You can also request more information or request a quote to get started with us today.

HACCP Principles and Food Safety with Packaging Equipment

The ideals of safety in the food industry include sanitation and hygiene, of course, but also involve the protection of food quality in terms of nutrients and flavors, worker safety, sustainability, and effective distribution worldwide. The global food industry is a complex system that has evolved to meet the needs of a population of 8 billion. Because of the sector’s complexities, strict standards set by international agencies and governments are required to maintain a working system without compromising safety or furthering climate change. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other organizations play a large role in regulating the food industry in the United States. Since 1997, these agencies and others have adopted Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles for food safety. As a manufacturer of innovative food packing equipment, Forpak follows strict industry guidelines including HACCP principles to maximize efficiency and safety.

Food Processors

HACCP has seven core principles that food processors can utilize to pinpoint issues in their systems and correct those potential hazards before they damage food quality, employee safety, or facilities.

For food safety and the prevention of other hazards, HACCP principles include:

Analysis of hazards:

Collecting data about the conditions of a hazard is a key first step in correcting those problems. Analyzing a stage in your assembly process for hazards also helps you follow the same pattern for future hazard points.

Find critical control points:

Once a hazard analysis sets your foundation, determining the critical control points will help you work to prevent that hazard from continuing. Control points are any kinds of steps, tools, or other components of your operations where control over safety can be applied.

Set limits:

Your limits are whatever minimum and maximum levels a control must be applied to reduce or prevent hazards. This can be a physical, chemical, or biological control limit.

Monitor process:

Observe changes you make in your controls and their limits to determine if more adjustments are needed and to collect data on that process.

Correct errors:

If your data collection on changes to control points and their limits results in a continued hazard, you should correct parameters to reduce that error. This principle also covers any corrections needed to noncompliance to laws, regulations, and standards.

Verify process:

When your control points and limits are accurately and reliably reducing or eliminating a hazard, establish a verification step that can be used in the future on other HACCP processes. Different steps of a HACCP process can be verified with varying frequencies depending on their scope of impact.

Keep detailed records:

To improve all your HACCP practices and corrective actions in general, you need to keep detailed records and establish procedures around those documentation processes.

At Forpak, we follow HACCP principles in all our manufacturing operations to ensure our products protect worker, equipment, and food safety in the packing industry. To learn more about our automated equipment, contact Forpak at (612) 419-1948 or forpaksupport@multisourcemfg.com. You can also request more information online today or request a quote to get started with us today.

Functional Factors of Integrated Circuit Packaging for Semiconductor Components

For more than 35 years, MultiSource Manufacturing LLC has worked to build semiconductor components and systems. Today, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and other customers rely on the precision and quality of our certified semiconductor fabrication. Thanks to our multiple facilities, we are able to offer a complete semiconductor production line, including a Class 1000 clean room, in-house electric, PFA welding and fabrication, and reverse engineering processes. Our team of engineers and technicians is comprised of trusted industry leaders in the manufacturing of full semiconductor assemblies, including the design and build of complex, state-of-the-art packages that fit a broad range of functional applications. If you are in need of semiconductor components or fully packaged assemblies, you can rely on MultiSource for fabrication from the prototyping to the inspection process.

Manufacturing Materials

When it comes to packaging semiconductor components for long-term protection and control of external factors, we implement various materials into that enclosure. We are capable of manufacturing with polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC), perfluoroalkoxy alkane (PFA), and other thermoplastics that are key in integrated circuit packaging.

For all our integrated circuit packaging designs, we consider four functional factors that the semiconductor system will face in an operating setting. The design factors include:

Electrical:

Characteristics of the semiconductor and electrical requirements can be controlled through the packaging. Integrated circuit packages can help regulate resistance, capacitance, inductance, and other properties of the semiconductor components and surrounding electronics with specific designs. Packages can also eliminate the risk of parasitic elements that can damage semiconductor signals.

Climate:

Packages must also be able to protect the semiconductor components from climate conditions outside the acceptable range. This includes protection from excess heat, moisture, dust, electromagnetics, and other elements. We design semiconductor packages to provide precise heat dissipation from the chip.

Mechanical:

Physical stress will also be a factor for semiconductors in operation. Packages need to be able to protect the chip from mechanical factors like jolts, bends, vibrations, and resonance.

Cost:

We work with carefully selected materials, precise clean room conditions, and high-powered technology to build semiconductor components. Our goal is to provide the best quality products at affordable prices. For all our packages, we choose the best quality polymers at a reasonable cost to our customers.

Integrated circuit packaging is a necessary part of a semiconductor assembly. The design, materials, and functionality of every package should be considered as important as the semiconductor components themselves.

For more information about our work in the semiconductor industry, contact MultiSource Manufacturing LLC at (952) 456-5500. You can also request more information or request a quote to get started with us today.

Importance of Food Industry Safety and Sanitation for Meat Packing

As populations soared in large cities, food packing throughout the United States had a grim start. The early factories, slaughter houses, and packing plants had very poor sanitation. Fortunately, the situation in the meatpacking industry is much different today. Factories are held to strict standards and every step of the raising, slaughtering, packing, and distributing of livestock meat adheres to the standards of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other regulatory organizations. At Forpak, we design and manufacture equipment that helps our customers maintain a streamlined packing system that meets food industry sanitation standards. Forpak equipment offers innovative solutions for multiple downstream production line operations, including stacking, conveying, autotransfers, reject systems, laning, sorting, and more.

Meat Industry

The meat industry in the United States began with fur trader William Pynchon when he started salt packing pork into barrels and shipping them to the West Indies. However, by the early 1800s, cities like Boston and Cincinnati were earning nicknames for the thousands of animals processed in various packing plants. In 1833, Cincinnati alone was processing 85,000 pigs a year, giving credence to its nickname “Porkopolis.”

USDA

In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln established the USDA to oversee the safe processing of meat products. After the turn of the century, when meat packing plants grew much larger thanks to industrial advances, the hygienic side of the industry couldn’t quite keep up. When Upton Sinclair published The Jungle in 1906, which detailed the dirty and brutal world of the meat industry in the United States, conditions would take a turn for the better.

Federal Meat Inspection Act

Over the years, multiple improvements have come to the meat industry thanks to government regulations like the Federal Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act, both in 1906; the Packers and Stockyards Act of 1921; meat grading laws; the establishment of the FDA in 1931; the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1939; the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act of 1958; and many others.

Food Industry

Sanitation and hygiene in the meat packing and food industry in general helps to prevent the spread of many foodborne illnesses. When it comes to meat products, sanitation and inspections, as well as the proper handling of livestock, prevent widespread illnesses from pathogens including:

Salmonella:

Exposure to Salmonella bacteria causes symptoms such as diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps. In some cases, infection can result in hospitalization and death.

Listeria:

Infection from Listeria monocytogenes causes diarrhea, fever, fatigue, muscle aches, and even sepsis in the bloodstream and meningitis (brain infection).

Escherichia coli:

coli infections can cause diarrhea, secondary urinary tract infections, respiratory illnesses, pneumonia, and other diseases.

Trichinella:

Most commonly associated with pork, the Trichinella worm is a parasite. Exposure to Trichinella can result in symptoms like nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, fever, fatigue, and stomach pains.

Preventing the spread of these illnesses requires our continued dedication to supporting safety in the food industry. To learn how our equipment can fit into your production line, contact Forpak at (612) 419-1948 or forpaksupport@multisourcemfg.com. You can also request more information online today or request a quote.

The History of Project Management and Current PM as a Contract Manufacturer

The MultiSource Manufacturing LLC network operates as several facilities across the Midwest. Our manufacturing locations have a comprehensive range of capabilities, technologies, and skilled team members. MultiSource was founded in 1998 and expanded to include all our branches today. Thanks to our trusted collaborating locations, we are able to manufacture precision-based parts, components, and full assemblies for multiple industries, including medical device, semiconductor, aerospace, defense, food packaging, and more. From the prototyping to the finishing processes, we can complete any project, big or small, for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) worldwide. When it comes to managing the journey of these projects, our project management practices and teams are key for continued communication, direct results, and reliable quality. If you need a contract manufacturer for any parts, the MultiSource network has the attention to detail and customer care of a small shop with the machining and engineering capabilities of a global operation.

Project Management Systems

While it may seem like a broad concept historically, the development of the project management systems we utilize actually have direct roots in civil engineering and defense strategies.

History

Before the 1900s, engineering projects requiring specific project management approaches were done by individuals such as architects, master builders, and engineers. One of the oldest examples of a creative individual running his own project management systems is Vitruvius during the 1st century BCE. Vitruvius was an architect who created building principles that were largely adopted into all future Roman architecture.

Forefathers

After the turn of the 19th century, industrial growth required a more standardized approach to project management. Henry Gantt and Henri Fayol are both considered forefathers of the modern project management system. In 1910, Gantt created the Gantt chart, one of the first bar charts that outlines a project schedule while taking into account the interdependence of each building stage.

Henri Fayol

Henri Fayol developed a theory of business administration and scientific project management (sometimes called Fayolism). His theory included six kinds of project organization and categorized activities, including technical, commercial, financial, security, accounting, and managerial.

Project Management Practices

Project management practices progressed even further through both World Wars, and by the 1950s, it was recognized as its own discipline as management with the engineering model. Two main mathematical management systems were developed: the critical path method (CPM) and the program evaluation and review technique (PERT). By the 1970s, most automotive, defense, and other global industries were using standardized project management strategies.

Contract Manufacturer

Today, as a contract manufacturer for a wide range of industries, MultiSource utilizes highly optimized management systems that aim for overall success of part design, production, assembly, and integration. Our project management systems have been a foundation for our 40+ years of experience working as a contract manufacturer for OEMs worldwide.

To learn how our equipment can fit into your production line, contact Forpak at (612) 419-1948 or forpaksupport@multisourcemfg.com. You can also request more information online today or request a quote.

Forpak Videos Featuring Our Food Assembly Equipment in Action

The food processing industry is unique in the strict sanitation and hygiene requirements set by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and other government and regulatory organizations. These regulations apply throughout every stage of the harvesting, processing, packing, storage, and distribution operations, including every step of the production line in industrial facilities. At Forpak, we design and build food assembly equipment that meets international requirements for safe-food packaging solutions. Our team of engineers, technicians, and other staff has over 30 years of experience in the automated packing equipment industry. Forpak equipment meets food safety standards for NSF 3A for meat and poultry, and Baking Industry Sanitation Standards Committee (BISSC) for bakery products.

Forpak manufactures intelligent designs for many packing operations such as laning, stacking, transferring, and more. We also work with clients in need of custom designs that can be integrated into unique facilities.

Food Assembly Euipment

With so many years working in the industry, we’ve created a broad range of designs for highly specialized and advanced food assembly equipment. To document the effectiveness of our equipment for clients and other interested parties, we have a diverse selection of video clips that capture our machines in action. These videos include the following:

Laning:

All our laning equipment can quickly and methodically sort products from a large jumble into neat paths that make packing more streamlined. Our video highlights include laning for two different waffle processing setups and a Melba toast packing facility.

Oscillating and splitting:

For products moving in a single stack down the production line, oscillators and splitters can quickly reduce the large groupings into systematic chutes. These videos, featuring waffles, pancakes, hamburger patties, and pizza crusts, show how quickly our machines can organize your line.

Reject systems:

We manufacture multiple kinds of reject systems, from vacuum rejection to conveyor retraction rejectors. Videos of automated reject systems for Melba toast, waffles, and hamburger patties show how production lines improve quality without needing to halt the machine.

Stacking:

In many packaging scenarios, food products need to be stacked in order to fit correctly into containers. Our automated stacking machines can sort and stack quickly without potential for human contamination in the process.

Diverting:

For single or stacked products, our diverters can control the path of food items moving on conveyors. To prevent overflow, traffic jams, and loss of quality products, diverters are a useful tool on a production line.

Conveying:

Conveyors are the foundation of any production line. Various formats, sizes, directions, and speeds of conveyors can fit into any kind of production facility. Without a reliable conveyor, movement in a facility is limited to human intervention.

Autotransfer:

In the food packaging process, autotransfers are key in organizing and sorting singular or stacked products. Transfers move items down the line in a precise system to prevent contamination or backup.

For more information about our videos and the food assembly equipment they capture in action, contact Forpak at (612) 419-1948 or forpaksupport@multisourcemfg.com. You can also request more information online today or request a quote to get started with us today.

The Importance of 3D Printing for the Future of Rapid Prototyping Services

At MultiSource Manufacturing LLC, we have a widespread network of several facilities that house a broad range of high-powered, precision-based machining, prototyping, and assembling tools and equipment. Our staff of engineers, technicians, project managers, and other important team members is highly skilled and capable of handling any production process in the industries we serve. Because we manufacture for such a large variety of industries, from aerospace and defense to semiconductors, it’s important for all our projects to start with a good foundation. A solid foundation for the project movement down the production line begins in the prototyping stages. We provide comprehensive prototyping services with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software and computerized numerical control (CNC) technology, experienced engineering teams, and 3D (three-dimensional) printing systems. For the future of prototyping processes, especially for rapid prototyping, 3D printing/additive manufacturing may be one of the most important technological capabilities.

3D printing allows the process of prototyping, which historically relies on CAD/CAM or tooling systems to become faster and more straightforward.

What are rapid prototyping services?

Rapid prototyping using 3D printing as the method of fabrication essentially operates on a three-stage cycle. The first step is the digital prototype creation with our versatile engineering software. Next our team reviews the part, including diagnostics, testing, and other analyses. Finally, we adjust the prototype based on the data we collect in the review stage, refining and reiterating the part until it is perfect.

Rapid prototyping with 3D printing allows us to move through these cycles very quickly with minimal materials wasted, and lower energy and labor costs. That faster movement through the cycle means clients get results sooner, can provide their own direct feedback, and see reduced expenses overall.

Why use 3D printing?

In today’s industrial world, the term rapid prototyping is often synonymous with “3D printing” or “additive manufacturing.” That’s because without the capabilities 3D printers provide, rapid prototyping would not be possible. 3D printers are precise, they move quickly, and the polymer materials printed cure almost instantly. This means that 3D printing can get your protype from a digital format to a physical one in a matter of minutes. Wait times for other prototyping processes and the time it takes to reiterate through the same slow process are both eliminated with 3D printing.

Traditional wait times with other prototyping services can take months. Some more complex components may even take years for a final prototype design to be developed. With 3D printing, those wait times are slashed to weeks or even days.

Not only is 3D printing faster, but it’s also cost-effective when it comes to materials and other production costs. To learn more about our rapid prototyping services and the benefits they provide, contact MultiSource Manufacturing LLC at (952) 456-5500. You can also request more information or request a quote to get started with us today.

Temperature Control and Meeting Standards for Food Safety in an Industrial Environment

The global food industry is a massive system that brings foods from all around the world to millions of communities. Because the industry is an enormous network with complex supply, storage, and distribution chains, following international safety standards is critical for all aspects of the system. Food industry standards can vary from place to place, but the majority of rules are set through the World Health Organization (WHO), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and others. In the United States, rigorous regulations are imposed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Different parts of the food industry also have their own organizations creating more specialized food safety standards unique to the operations of that specific setting. At Forpak, we design and build innovative food packaging systems for the bakery, meat, poultry, and pizza industries. Our equipment follows food safety guidelines and laws with the installation of several features and pieces of equipment.

Equipment that Integrates

All our equipment, from stackers to reject systems, is designed to integrate seamlessly into existing factory settings and production lines. To allow for full wash-down sanitation, our Rockwell Automation controls are protected from water exposure with NEMA 4X Watershed Enclosures, and our designs also eliminate the risk of harborage and bacterial growth with stainless steel surfaces.

Fabrication Process

With all our fabrication processes, Forpak meets multiple specialized food safety standards, including NSF 3A for meat and poultry, Baking Industry Sanitation Standards Committee (BISSC) for baking, and more. After our equipment is installed in client facilities, the next step in food processing safety comes with temperature control.

Temperature Control

Temperature control of an entire facility, a section of the production line, and the equipment itself is critical for refrigerated and frozen processing. Because Forpak equipment handles mostly frozen and refrigerated products, our customers’ facilities meet the required food safety parameters.

Danger zone:

For regulatory compliance, food processors need to operate outside of the “danger zone.” Bacteria, viruses, mold, and other foodborne illnesses are active and reproductive between a zone of 40ºF (4ºC) and 140ºF (60ºC). Because these pathogens can still be reproductive at a limited capacity in a slight range beyond those exact temperatures, food should be handled at a known safety point. For frozen goods, this means industrial processing lines should be kept at 0ºF (-18ºC) to -5ºF (-20ºC). Refrigerated goods can be processed at temperatures between 35ºF (2ºC) and 38ºF (3ºC). Pathogenic reactions aren’t necessarily completely eliminated at these safe temperatures, but they are halted until temperatures rise as food is thawed.

Common Foodborne Bacteria

Common foodborne bacteria and other microorganisms that can be controlled with regulated temperatures include:

  • Hyperthermophiles: minimum reproductive and survival temperatures of 176°F
  • Mesophiles: minimum reproductive and survival temperatures of 41–50°F
  • Psychrophiles: minimum reproductive and survival temperatures of 14–41°F
  • Psychrotrophs: minimum reproductive and survival temperatures of 32–41°F
  • Thermophiles: minimum reproductive and survival temperatures of 68–104°F

To learn more about how our equipment promotes food safety, call Forpak at (612) 419-1948 or email us at forpaksupport@multisourcemfg.com. You can also request more information online today or request a quote to get started with us today.

 

Entering the Fourth Industrial Revolution as a Multi-Strength Contract Manufacturer

In the past two hundred years, the world has moved through several social, cultural, political, and technological changes, including three industrial revolutions. The First Industrial Revolution occurred between the mid-1700s and mid-1800s with a transition into steam and water power. The Second Industrial Revolution occurred between the late 1800s and early 1900s, when railroads became widespread and electricity was introduced for many different applications. The Third Industrial Revolution began in the late 1980s with the burst of computer technology and the internet. In the last 20 years, we’ve been moving through the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which came about through the rapid growth in the expanse of internet connectivity, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and augmented realities. As a contract manufacturer building precision-based parts, components, and full assemblies, MultiSource Manufacturing LLC grows and advances with the industries we serve.

Industry 4.0

Industry 4.0 is the conceptualization of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Its core aspects emphasize the connectivity, automation, and rapid advancements in the technological capabilities of modern industry.

Contract Manufacturer

MultiSource works as a contract manufacturer for a broad range of industries that require extreme precision, highly reliable quality, and trusted materials, including the medical device, semiconductor, aerospace, and defense industries. We also work with our Forpak partners to build innovative automated food processing equipment that meets strict food safety standards.

All of the parts and assemblies we manufacture for these industries fit into the mold of Industry 4.0 through our prototyping, technology, and practices.

Prototyping:

MultiSource engineers practice reverse engineering based on proven specifications and geometries, but we also provide prototyping services using intelligent CAD systems, 3D printing, and CNC controls. Our prototyping strategies follow Industry 4.0’s core elements of information transparency, massive data collection, and computer support. Throughout the prototyping process, we have a fully open line of communication with all our clients.

Technology:

Our facilities have always hosted state-of-the-art technology and highly precise machining centers. Today, we have access to a wide range of technology across our six fabrication locations. Intelligent automation is another key component of Industry 4.0. Our multi-axis CNC machining centers, advanced software programs, computer technology, and other tools push our production floor into the future.

Practices:

Throughout our facilities, from the customer service desk to the clean room, our practices continue to support Industry 4.0’s value for communication and connectivity. We find projects run smoothly and yield the highest quality products with a network of communication across all our departments and at every stage of the production process.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution

The Fourth Industrial Revolution will change many parts of our world, but manufacturers and engineers will see some of the first new standards take place. To learn more about our work as a contract manufacturer, contact MultiSource Manufacturing LLC today at (952) 456-5500, request more information, or request a quote.

 

Forpak Technical Support and Extra Maintenance Services for Your Food Packaging Equipment

The global food industry has some of the most rigorous safety standards compared to most other types of production. Not only do these standards and regulations apply to the product, equipment, and factory practices, but also to the shipping, storage, distribution, and other business processes. Down to particulars like the shelf life of packaging materials, the food industry imposes requirements and sets standards meant to protect the consumer, the manufacturer, and the planet. While these regulations are strict, they are critical for a reliable, safe, and sustainable industry that can feed the world. A large part of the food industry that can make or break safety standards is the packaging process. Food products are harvested and distributed on a wide-scale global network for today’s cosmopolitan, internationalized consumers. Packing such a range of food items for shipping and storage in all kinds of climates is a challenge that packaging engineers and food processing facilities have met in many ways. With our own engineers and packing experts, Forpak works with facilities in the bakery, pizza, and meat industries to provide innovative solutions to the world’s food packaging equipment obstacles.

Forpak Food Packaging Equipment

Forpak food packaging equipment designs are unique systems for the full factory automation of several conveyor steps, including transfers, stacking, sorting, laning, reject systems, and more. We also work with clients to tailor custom designs that meet their facility needs. All our designs can be integrated seamlessly into existing production lines with limited downtime in customer schedules.

Installation and Maintenance

To make the installation and maintenance process as fast and reliable as possible, Forpak technicians provide complete technical support in addition to our new preventative maintenance benefits program.

Technical Support

Our technical support starts with the installation and start-up of your new equipment. Forpak equipment can be installed in any production line, but with our own technicians in the facilities with exactly the right tools, knowledge, and experience, your equipment can be quickly and perfectly integrated. Our service technicians will perform the installation and new equipment start-up process. We also offer Machine Operator Training for our equipment to any of your staff members.

Warranty

With ongoing technical support, Forpak customers will benefit from a 12-month parts warranty, spare parts packages, and 95% of all parts available for same-day shipping. Our tech staff is available for phone support during all business hours, but we also provide on-site support with certified Forpak technicians. We work with customers to schedule all the necessary upgrades, parts replacement, and preventative maintenance through our brand new support program.

Preventive Maintenance

Our preventative maintenance program is designed to support Forpak customers with comprehensive care. Customers benefit from discounts, personalized maintenance, and optimized scheduling, and they can also expect a significant increase in equipment longevity and a reduction of repair downtime.

To learn more about our preventative maintenance program and technical support for our food packaging equipment, contact Forpak by calling (612) 419-1948 or emailing forpaksupport@multisourcemfg.com. You can also request more information online or request a quote to get started with us today.