Importance of Food Industry Safety and Sanitation for Meat Packing

As populations soared in large cities, food packing throughout the United States had a grim start. The early factories, slaughter houses, and packing plants had very poor sanitation. Fortunately, the situation in the meatpacking industry is much different today. Factories are held to strict standards and every step of the raising, slaughtering, packing, and distributing of livestock meat adheres to the standards of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other regulatory organizations. At Forpak, we design and manufacture equipment that helps our customers maintain a streamlined packing system that meets food industry sanitation standards. Forpak equipment offers innovative solutions for multiple downstream production line operations, including stacking, conveying, autotransfers, reject systems, laning, sorting, and more.

Meat Industry

The meat industry in the United States began with fur trader William Pynchon when he started salt packing pork into barrels and shipping them to the West Indies. However, by the early 1800s, cities like Boston and Cincinnati were earning nicknames for the thousands of animals processed in various packing plants. In 1833, Cincinnati alone was processing 85,000 pigs a year, giving credence to its nickname “Porkopolis.”

USDA

In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln established the USDA to oversee the safe processing of meat products. After the turn of the century, when meat packing plants grew much larger thanks to industrial advances, the hygienic side of the industry couldn’t quite keep up. When Upton Sinclair published The Jungle in 1906, which detailed the dirty and brutal world of the meat industry in the United States, conditions would take a turn for the better.

Federal Meat Inspection Act

Over the years, multiple improvements have come to the meat industry thanks to government regulations like the Federal Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act, both in 1906; the Packers and Stockyards Act of 1921; meat grading laws; the establishment of the FDA in 1931; the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1939; the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act of 1958; and many others.

Food Industry

Sanitation and hygiene in the meat packing and food industry in general helps to prevent the spread of many foodborne illnesses. When it comes to meat products, sanitation and inspections, as well as the proper handling of livestock, prevent widespread illnesses from pathogens including:

Salmonella:

Exposure to Salmonella bacteria causes symptoms such as diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps. In some cases, infection can result in hospitalization and death.

Listeria:

Infection from Listeria monocytogenes causes diarrhea, fever, fatigue, muscle aches, and even sepsis in the bloodstream and meningitis (brain infection).

Escherichia coli:

coli infections can cause diarrhea, secondary urinary tract infections, respiratory illnesses, pneumonia, and other diseases.

Trichinella:

Most commonly associated with pork, the Trichinella worm is a parasite. Exposure to Trichinella can result in symptoms like nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, fever, fatigue, and stomach pains.

Preventing the spread of these illnesses requires our continued dedication to supporting safety in the food industry. To learn how our equipment can fit into your production line, contact Forpak at (612) 419-1948 or forpaksupport@multisourcemfg.com. You can also request more information online today or request a quote.

The History of Project Management and Current PM as a Contract Manufacturer

The MultiSource Manufacturing LLC network operates as several facilities across the Midwest. Our manufacturing locations have a comprehensive range of capabilities, technologies, and skilled team members. MultiSource was founded in 1998 and expanded to include all our branches today. Thanks to our trusted collaborating locations, we are able to manufacture precision-based parts, components, and full assemblies for multiple industries, including medical device, semiconductor, aerospace, defense, food packaging, and more. From the prototyping to the finishing processes, we can complete any project, big or small, for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) worldwide. When it comes to managing the journey of these projects, our project management practices and teams are key for continued communication, direct results, and reliable quality. If you need a contract manufacturer for any parts, the MultiSource network has the attention to detail and customer care of a small shop with the machining and engineering capabilities of a global operation.

Project Management Systems

While it may seem like a broad concept historically, the development of the project management systems we utilize actually have direct roots in civil engineering and defense strategies.

History

Before the 1900s, engineering projects requiring specific project management approaches were done by individuals such as architects, master builders, and engineers. One of the oldest examples of a creative individual running his own project management systems is Vitruvius during the 1st century BCE. Vitruvius was an architect who created building principles that were largely adopted into all future Roman architecture.

Forefathers

After the turn of the 19th century, industrial growth required a more standardized approach to project management. Henry Gantt and Henri Fayol are both considered forefathers of the modern project management system. In 1910, Gantt created the Gantt chart, one of the first bar charts that outlines a project schedule while taking into account the interdependence of each building stage.

Henri Fayol

Henri Fayol developed a theory of business administration and scientific project management (sometimes called Fayolism). His theory included six kinds of project organization and categorized activities, including technical, commercial, financial, security, accounting, and managerial.

Project Management Practices

Project management practices progressed even further through both World Wars, and by the 1950s, it was recognized as its own discipline as management with the engineering model. Two main mathematical management systems were developed: the critical path method (CPM) and the program evaluation and review technique (PERT). By the 1970s, most automotive, defense, and other global industries were using standardized project management strategies.

Contract Manufacturer

Today, as a contract manufacturer for a wide range of industries, MultiSource utilizes highly optimized management systems that aim for overall success of part design, production, assembly, and integration. Our project management systems have been a foundation for our 40+ years of experience working as a contract manufacturer for OEMs worldwide.

To learn how our equipment can fit into your production line, contact Forpak at (612) 419-1948 or forpaksupport@multisourcemfg.com. You can also request more information online today or request a quote.